Eliminating the reporting bottleneck at CCBCC



Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated (CCBCC), the largest independent Coca-Cola bottling firm in the US, serves 12 states. Since adopting Tableau, the business intelligence team at the CCBCC has:

  • Moved from monthly to daily dashboard updates
  • Provided more than 800 employees with data insight on mobile devices
  • Improved their ability to track and combat shrink—a million-dollar issue.

When people in the Southeastern U.S. enjoy a cold bottle of Coke, they likely have the Coca-Cola Bottling Company (CCBCC) to thank. Located in Charlotte, North Carolina, the CCBCC serves 12 states and is the largest independent Coke bottler in the United States.

Before Tableau:

  • Dashboards provided fresh views once/month—a 1000+ step process
  • IT and the business struggled to understand each other’s needs
  • Field sales teams and executives had to be in the office to view the latest data reports
  • Losses due to shrink—a million-dollar issue—was difficult to address

Now with Tableau:

  • Dashboards are updated daily, with a single click
  • IT and the business are working together in a rewarding partnership
  • More than 800 employees regularly access dashboards via mobile devices
  • The team has more ability to track and combat shrink

In video 1, three members of the CCBC business intelligence team talk about how getting out of the “report factory” mode has freed them to provide true analysis. In video 2, their business data architect shares how IT can now be the hero for the business, rather than a frustration. Finally, in video 3, their senior business analyst shares how Tableau is helping field sales with mobile insight.

If I'm doing the same thing over and over again, I'm never able to step out the box. Tableau allows us to step out of the box. It allows us to be able to look at data in a totally different way.

“Now we can be analysts versus report generators"

Tableau: You have hundreds of field sales people. How do use data to help them work more effectively?

Shawn Crenshaw, Senior Business Analyst: We do most of the reporting for sales and delivery, so anything that ranges for the people selling the product to people delivering the product, we handle that reporting.

We range from marketing to a home market, which is essentially where you see the big stores at Walmart, in the pub, at your grocery stores, how we're doing in those stores, to the delivery of the actual product.

And so it ranges from what we're looking at what is efficiency data, which means data. Are we delivering product at the time we say we're going to deliver it to you—what is profitability. We have a budget. Are we meeting that budget and how well are we doing against that budget, forecasting, those type of things.

Tableau: How does mobile play into this?

Shawn: At Coke Consolidated, mobile is a key. We try to make sure our sales force is not stuck in the office, because we're primarily responsible for selling the product. And spending time in an office looking at metrics, crunching numbers is not their job. Their job is to sell product.

And so with that in mind, the leadership had their vision of making our sales force mobile. And so that included buying personal iPads. So in order to supply the data that they need, we need to make sure that we had an application or a software that would be compatible with the iPad. That's where Tableau comes in.

And so now whenever we build reports or dashboards we build with the iPad in mind, with mobility in mind. So everything we've built has to be efficient enough so somebody can get to it in two clicks and they can make a decision right then and there.

Tableau: That must really help your sales force out in the field!

Shawn: Not only the people in the field, but also our executives as well. They're out in the markets, they're out with customers. So if they have questions, instead of them having to pull up a Excel spreadsheet or pull up some kind of document, they go straight to their iPad, pull up a dashboard and answer the questions right then and there.

And so Tableau has provided us with the ability to be that way, not only provide accurate data but to customize it just for the user experience to help them become more adaptable to the data—to receive it.

Tableau: How is the response to self-service data access within the IT department?
Bryan Franklin, Business Data Architect: What IT people love is when you come to them and say, "Hey, I've got a problem and I need you to help me solve it."

I have seen something of resistance in the IT space. I think primarily because their KPIs are different than the business. Their KPIs are stability—and innovation and the business being able to go out and do self-service, that can jeopardize stability. And so there's a resistance or a hesitancy to let people go in and explore, because it's risky.

When that happens, it's a lose-lose. IT wastes their time and the business doesn't get what they need.

What the business self-service concept gives IT the ability to do, it's no longer an order-taker type of mentality where, “This is what I need, I need you to do it by X timeframe, and you produce it.”

And then you're not sure if they're going to like it. And a lot of times they don't. And then that's kind of makes a lot of frustration.

So that frustrating feeling, if you can take that and say, "Hey, I'm going to partner with you," the businessperson can do what they know how to do, and the IT person doesn't necessarily have to know the intricacies or the ins and outs of the business. But the businessperson can say, "Hey, I've got this query or I've got this dataset, I need help."

Tableau: That sounds much better for everyone!
Bryan: That's the match made in heaven where the IT person gets to say, “Okay, I can help you, I can tune that, I can rearrange that, we can remodel this data.” And they're in their comfort zone, and then they produce that information.

And the business can take it and say, “Hey, thanks, man. That sped that up from 10 minutes down to 10 seconds. You're amazing!”

That sort of collaboration and being able to work together as a team, I think that that builds relationship between IT and the business.

We talked about the waterfall methodology, talked about the standard SDLC, you know, processes that IT is very familiar with. And they were just very slow, especially in the BI space.

So when you start getting into that agile methodology and you start turning out product faster, the business starts to get more engaged, they start to get more excited.

Well, that's what IT wants to begin with. They want somebody to be excited about what it is they're building. When you start building that excitement and IT's in, they're like, "Sure, let's do it, I'll show them."

Enabling mobile insight

Tableau: You have hundreds of field sales people. How do use data to help them work more effectively?
Shawn Crenshaw, Senior Business Analyst: We do most of the reporting for sales and delivery, so anything that ranges for the people selling the product to people delivering the product, we handle that reporting.

We range from marketing to a home market, which is essentially where you see the big stores at Walmart, in the pub, at your grocery stores, how we're doing in those stores, to the delivery of the actual product.

And so it ranges from what we're looking at what is efficiency data, which means data. Are we delivering product at the time we say we're going to deliver it to you—what is profitability. We have a budget. Are we meeting that budget and how well are we doing against that budget, forecasting, those type of things.

Tableau: How does mobile play into this?
Shawn: At Coke Consolidated, mobile is a key. We try to make sure our sales force is not stuck in the office, because we're primarily responsible for selling the product. And spending time in an office looking at metrics, crunching numbers is not their job. Their job is to sell product.

And so with that in mind, the leadership had their vision of making our sales force mobile. And so that included buying personal iPads. So in order to supply the data that they need, we need to make sure that we had an application or a software that would be compatible with the iPad. That's where Tableau comes in.

And so now whenever we build reports or dashboards we build with the iPad in mind, with mobility in mind. So everything we've built has to be efficient enough so somebody can get to it in two clicks and they can make a decision right then and there.

Tableau: That must really help your sales force out in the field!
Shawn: Not only the people in the field, but also our executives as well. They're out in the markets, they're out with customers. So if they have questions, instead of them having to pull up a Excel spreadsheet or pull up some kind of document, they go straight to their iPad, pull up a dashboard and answer the questions right then and there.

And so Tableau has provided us with the ability to be that way, not only provide accurate data but to customize it just for the user experience to help them become more adaptable to the data—to receive it.



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