ORU Aquitaine transforms emergency room data with Tableau



ORU (Observatoire Régional des Urgences) Aquitaine collects and interprets data on emergency room medicine for healthcare organizations. Before, they lacked a way to give clients clear feedback on their data. When ORU switched to presenting data in Tableau, their clients were surprised by what they saw.

Antoine Tignon, IT Developer/Engineer at ORU Aquitaine, chose Tableau over other solutions because it was affordable, easy to set up, and appealed to a wide audience of physicians, institution managers, and politicians.

By setting user permissions and governing what clients see in Tableau Server, ORU Aquitaine creates a personalized experience. When a client logs into Tableau Server, they only see dashboards that are relevant to them.

Since ORU Aquitaine's shift to Tableau, some 36 clients have shared that they're gaining insights about their emergency room data that they never knew before.


Tableau: How has Tableau helped you?
Antoine Tignon, IT Developer/Engineer: Thanks to Tableau, I was able to put data that had been a bit obscure up until now into a nice, readable format.

Tableau: Why did choose Tableau over other solutions?
Antoine: The idea was to quickly set up feedback on the data that had been collected since as far back as 2008 in the case of some institutions. We, therefore, performed a case study on the different types of software that might be out there for data analysis and visualization.

After several tests, we realized that Tableau was the quickest to set up, the least costly, and most of all, the most appealing. Having such sexy chart elements makes things much more practical when discussing them with physicians, institution managers, or politicians.

We soon found that Tableau was the solution that best suited us for quickly moving forward in terms of observation and showing that we had something useful.

We started with quickly accessible dashboards, which showed a lot of data quickly. Eventually, we arrived at something even more accurate and people-oriented, to tell [users] more and to allow them to really immerse themselves in the information.

Tableau: What reaction did you receive from clients?
Antoine: At the time, there were 36 institutions in the region, 36 emergency departments that were rather surprised to see that we already had all this information about how their emergency departments were working and how people were being cared for. Also, to have an idea about chain analysis and to know where patients with heart disease had been referred to.

People didn’t expect us to have this type of information so quickly because the database was put together just a short time before. But no one had really looked into it or given any feedback. Having this chart element of Tableau, and having set it up in a about three months before we were publishing on our website with the help of dashboards, and providing institutions with loads of data items with complete transparency.

Tableau: What prompted you to start using Tableau Server to share dashboards with clients?
Antoine: Now, with the arrival of the grand region and thus of Aquitaine-Limousin-Poitou-Charentes, we made the choice to start up with Tableau Server, to have a few more users and a more territorial vision. This way, when someone from, for example, Dordogne logs on, instead of connecting to a random institution of the grand region, they reach their own territory and get information that is relevant to them.

We started with quickly accessible dashboards, which showed a lot of data quickly, and eventually arrived at something even more accurate and people-oriented, to tell them more and to allow them to really immerse themselves in the information.



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