By Ross Perez 25 Abr, 2010

The wait is over! The judges have chosen a winner in our Tableau Public visualization contest. Emerging victorious on top of some incredible vizzes is Rina Petersen's "Fit and Fat in America". Click into a state to begin exploring her interactive app.

Rina summarizes the issues surrounding this visualization quite well.

Obesity is a prevalent health issue and a growing epidemic in America. If you put it in a broader context, the average obesity rate in the US is the highest in the world (27.2), more than twice the worldwide average (14.1).

In this contest, many visualizations showed the overwhelming obesity rates in America. However, Rina won by allowing her users to examine different factors associated with obesity and decide for themselves which have the greatest effect. Whats more, she did it in a beautiful package while sticking to viz best practices. Notice that she fixed the axis on her bar chart and all of her titles, tooltips and legends are clearly explained. In a field of winners, the little things really count.

For her in-depth analysis and top-notch viz chops, Rina will be attending Web 2.0 in San Francisco. Congratulations Rina, and nice work!


Very nice use of explanations in the headers. I particularly like the use of bar charts versus the normalized US Average. Very clever way to depict the delta. Well done!

congratulations to Rina!
are you going to post a list of all the entries? I would love to see what other people have done with the data. It's very insightful to look at the packaged workbooks, look at the data selection, the calculated fields, etc.

Congrats Rina!. I like the flow from State down to county level, helping the user to dig down into the factors that contribute to obecity and see how they differ from region to region and then county to county. I also really like the version that she posted as a link on her site that puts all the data in one page (a more landscaped view) than the version where you have to scroll down.

Great job Rina.

Great charts, but what is the "obesity rate"? Per thousand??? No definition.